3D Postural Dysfunctions

The ol’ song is true, "the ankle bone’s connected to the shin bone…" The following 6 postures represent the most common postural dysfunctions of the human body. Most people have a combination of postures shown. So which posture(s) best represents you?
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Posture 1
Posture 2
Posture 3
Posture 4
Posture 5
Posture 6
Not Sure
Posture 1
Posture 2
Posture 3
Posture 4
Posture 5
Posture 6
Not Sure
Posture 1
  • Hips tilted forward
  • Excessive arch in lower back
  • Knees point out (thighs rotated outward; could include bowlegs)
  • Feet usually wider than hip width and pointed outward
  • Head jetted forward
  • Shoulders rounded – arms and hands rotated inward
  • Usual muscle characteristics: Tight hip flexors, and thigh muscles; Tight back muscles; Stretched and/or weak Abdominals; Tight calves and ankles
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Posture 2
  • Hips tilted backward and minimal buttocks development
  • Minimal to no curve in lower back (flat back)
  • Knees pointed in (thighs rotated inward; could include knock-knees)
  • Head Jetted forward
  • Usual muscle characteristics: Weak hips (hip flexors; buttocks muscles); Tight abdominals; Tight and weak hamstring muscles; Weak lower back muscles; Stretched and/or weak lower back muscles
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Posture 3
  • Hips rotated
  • Shoulders / torso rotated
  • If both hips and torso rotated, they can rotate in same direction or in opposite
  • Head / neck rotated
  • Loss of balanced muscle function, i.e. apparent that one side of body functions different than the other
  • Rotation usually causes one thigh, knee, foot to be pointed out more that the other
  • Rotation usually causes one shoulder, arm, hand, to be forward more than the other
  • Usual muscle characteristics: The following muscles have tightness and/or weakness usually appearing on one side more than other: Hips, shoulders, arms, lower back, buttocks, hamstrings, lower legs directions
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Posture 4
  • Mid / upper back rounded
  • Shoulder blades typically winged out to side
  • Shoulders rounded forward
  • Arms and hands rotated inward, usually in front of thighs
  • Head jetted forward
  • Minimal curve in lower back
  • Usual muscle characteristics: Weak mid back / shoulder blade muscles; Tight and weak upper back and shoulder muscles; Tight neck and jaw muscles; Tight chest muscles; Weak hips
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Posture 5
  • Hips forward of the line of gravity, creating a "swayback" in the lower back
  • Minimal buttocks development (loss of muscle)
  • Knees and feet point outward (thighs rotated outward)
  • Mid / upper back rounded
  • Head jetted forward
  • Usual muscle characteristics: Weak hip flexors; Weak buttocks muscles; Weak lower abdominals; Tight upper abdominals; Weak mid back muscles; Tight and weak hamstring muscles; Weak lower back muscles; Tight upper back and neck muscles
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Posture 6
  • Torso shifted to one side ñ spine takes on a lateral "S" curvature (as in scoliosis)
  • One hip higher/lower than the other
  • One shoulder higher/lower than the other
  • Head leaning towards one shoulder
  • Loss of balanced (bilateral) muscle function, i.e. apparent that one side of body functions different than the other
  • Usual muscle characteristics: The following muscles have tightness and/or weakness usually appearing on one side more than other: Hips, shoulders, arms, middle back, lower back, neck, buttocks, hamstrings, lower legs. In addition, can be noticeable greater muscle development in the back muscles on one side, in shoulder and chest muscles on one side, and in the hip (especially buttocks) muscles on one side
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Posture 1
Posture 2
Posture 3
Posture 4
Posture 5
Posture 6


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3D Postural Dysfunctions
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